Deaf Art: De’Via

An image of a male torso with ASL sign for ART surrounded with pencils, paint brushes, colour pencils and crayons

De’VIA is an art movement formed by Deaf artists to express their Deaf experience. The term was coined by a group of Deaf artists in 1989 at the first Deaf Way festival, and it stands for Deaf View Image Art.

While Deaf artists create art that deals with the same subject matter as hearing artists, De’VIA artists and art express the particular experiences born of being Deaf. This art can focus on the physical and cultural characteristics of being Deaf, and can include Deaf metaphors and perspectives as well as Deaf insights into environments (natural and cultural), spiritual life, and everyday life.

De’VIA art often makes use of bold, contrasting colours and textures. It frequently uses a strong central image, and facial features such as eyes, mouths, and ears, as well as hands, are emphasized.

Some famous De’VIA artists are Betty G. Miller, Chuck Baird, Ann Silver, and Mary J. Thornley.

DEAF ART WEBSITE