Category

Language Deprivation

Nyle DiMarco Foundation – Parent’s Corner

By ASL, Cultural & Medical Perspectives, Deaf Ecosystem, Deaf Role Models, Early ASL Acquisition, Early Language Development, Information, Language Deprivation, Organizations, Research

Banner for The Nyle DiMarco Foundation website - background image of Nyle DiMarco standing in front of a blue background with a circle pattern

The Nyle DiMarco Foundation is a non-profit organization that exists as a national philanthropic resource for all organizations, institutions and individuals working to improve the lives of every Deaf person in the world.

Current Priority Area: Deaf Children and their Families

The Foundation aims to improve access to accurate, research-based information about early language acquisition–specifically, the bilingual education approach. Through the early intervention process, the child’s language and literacy development should be the focal point.

Nyle and the Foundation are guided by the principle that every child deserves love and language.

Because the reality is that Deaf children can grow to be anything they want: firefighter or police officer, defense attorney or brain surgeon, elementary teacher or college professor, software developer or the creator of the next major social media outlet–or even an internationally recognized supermodel, actor, and dancing phenom. The key to unlocking a Deaf child’s future is acquiring language at an early age.

Nyle’s story provides validation: he was born into a multigenerational Deaf family and was taught American Sign Language and English from birth.

Through the Foundation, Nyle wants to work with parents and families to ensure Deaf children receive the same opportunities he did.

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Blue background with white text "Gallaudet University / Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center - Deaf Schools. Deaf Education: Serving Families and Professional Nationwide."

Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center

By ASL, Bilingual, Bilingual Education, Deaf Ecosystem, Deaf Role Models, Early ASL Acquisition, Early Intervention, Early Language Development, Identity, Information, Language Deprivation, Programs, Research

Blue background with white text "Gallaudet University / Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center - Deaf Schools. Deaf Education: Serving Families and Professional Nationwide."The Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center at Gallaudet University is a federally funded center with exemplary elementary and secondary education programs for deaf and hard of hearing students and is tasked with developing and disseminating innovative curricula, instructional techniques, and products nationwide while providing information, training, and technical assistance for parents and professionals to meet the needs of deaf and hard of hearing students from birth to age 21.

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Semilingualism and Monolingualism

By ASL, Bilingual, Early ASL Acquisition, Early Language Development, Information, Language Deprivation, Research

colourful bubbles with different languages

What does monolingualism mean?

Being monolingual means knowing one language. Many people who grow up in Canada may be monolingual and know only English or French. In contrast, many Deaf Canadians may be bilingual because they use two or more languages, for instance, they might use ASL and the written form of English.

What does semilingualism mean?

In order to become fluently bilingual, with strong language skills in two languages, a child must have early access to a first language or “mother tongue”, preferably from birth. When children are given late, infrequent or inadequate exposure to two or more languages, they may become semilingual rather than bilingual. When a child is semilingual they seem to not have a full grasp of any language, and tend to mix the vocabulary, grammar and structure of the two languages together so that the child may not be fully able to express themselves in any language. In order to reap the benefits of being bilingual, a child must be given the opportunity to develop a strong first language.

What does semilingualism mean for Deaf children?

Since more than 90% of Deaf children are born into hearing families who may not know ASL, it is crucial for parents to make the extra effort so that Deaf children are exposed to a signed language (ASL) as early as possible in order to have a strong first language that is visual and 100% accessible. By being given frequent and consistent exposure to ASL through communication with family members, videos, and socializing with other Deaf children, a first language can develop which is the first step to developing strong language and critical thinking skills. By having ASL as a first language, it will be easier to acquire English because the child already has knowledge of language structure and has the ability to connect ideas. Without frequent exposure to ASL and with only limited access to English (since the child does not have full access to spoken English), the child is in danger of never fully acquiring either ASL or English and becoming semilingual. By making the effort to expose your child to ASL as frequently and as early as possible, your child can thrive and learn how to communicate in two languages- ASL and English.

References:

  1. Cummins, J. (1979). Linguistic Interdependence and the Educational Development of Bilingual Children. Review of Educational Research, 49(2), 222-251.
  2. Grosjean, F. (1992). The Bilingual & the Bicultural Person In the Hearing & in the Deaf World. Sign Language Studies 77, 307-320.

Language Deprivation Syndrome Lecture

By Bilingual, Bilingual Education, Cultural & Medical Perspectives, Early ASL Acquisition, Early Intervention, Early Language Development, Information, Language Deprivation, Research

The single greatest risk faced by Deaf people is inadequate exposure to a usable first language. Dr. Gulati reviews recent research which validates the anatomical basis and time course of the critical period for first language acquisition, and which shows the risks to the development of empathetic abilities among children who are language-deprived.

Human Rights Day 2018

By ASL, Early ASL Acquisition, Early Language Development, Information, Language Deprivation, Research No Comments

Today is Human Rights Day 2018. It is Deaf babies’ human right to have full access to sign language from birth.

Unfortunately, 3 out of 4 Deaf babies do not have full access to sign language from birth and 98% of Deaf children do not have access to education in sign language. This is a gross violation of Deaf babies and children’s human rights.

Video also can be found at YouTube: https://youtu.be/jPaBuRzzykE

RELEVANT LINKS:
Human Rights Day 2018
by: United Nations
http://www.un.org/en/events/humanrightsday/

Deaf people as a linguistic and cultural group
By: World Federation of the Deaf
https://wfdeaf.org/…/LM-and-D-Discussion-Paper-FINAL-11-May…

WFD Position Paper on the Language Rights of Deaf Children by: World Federation of the Deaf https://wfdeaf.org/…/wfd-position-paper-language-rights-de…/

Human Rights of Deaf People – Bilingual Education
by: World Federation of the Deaf
https://wfdeaf.org/our-work/human-rights-of-the-deaf/

Annual Survey of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Children and Youth 2011-12 Regional and National Summary by: Gallaudet Research Institute http://research.gallaudet.edu/Dem…/2012_National_Summary.pdf (page 11)

Nyle DiMarco unveils new language deprivation video: ‘We felt we could tell a story that touched the heart’
by: Nyle DiMarco Foundation
http://ew.com/…/nyle-dimarco-language-deprivation-awarenes…/

 

10 Deaf Children, 1 Powerful Message

By ASL, Audism, Information, Language Deprivation No Comments

Every day, Deaf people “fail” the hearing test immediately after being born, face “language delays” with their hearing family that don’t learn their natural language, and attempt “perfect speech” in order to fit into the hearing world. They fight to use interpreters that benefit both the hearing and the Deaf, and deal with job discrimination — all simply because they cannot hear.