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Deaf History

Deaf Art: De’Via

By Deaf Community, Deaf Culture, Deaf Ecosystem, Deaf History, Information

De’VIA is an art movement formed by Deaf artists to express their Deaf experience. The term was coined by a group of Deaf artists in 1989 at the first Deaf Way festival, and it stands for Deaf View Image Art.
While Deaf artists create art that deals with the same subject matter as hearing artists, De’VIA artists and art express the particular experiences born of being Deaf. This art can focus on the physical and cultural characteristics of being Deaf, and can include Deaf metaphors and perspectives as well as Deaf insights into environments (natural and cultural), spiritual life, and everyday life.
De’VIA art often makes use of bold, contrasting colours and textures. It frequently uses a strong central image, and facial features such as eyes, mouths, and ears, as well as hands, are emphasized.
Some famous De’VIA artists are Betty G. Miller, Chuck Baird, Ann Silver, and Mary J. Thornley.

Tracing the Roots of Deafness to a Gene that Maybe Prevented Disease

By Deaf History, Information, Research No Comments

Dr. Braun is currently reconstructing the genealogy of the connexin 26 gene, which causes much of the congenital deafness in the American deaf community. The overall goal of this project is to answer some fundamental questions about why and how the large number of current connexin 26 mutations first appeared, and what these mutations and their histories can tell us about human evolution. There is some fascinating evidence that connexin 26 mutations might make deaf individuals resistant to diarrheal diseases such as dysentery and cholera, a major cause of death over the past 2,000 years.

Derek Braun is a professor and geneticist at Gallaudet University’s Department of Science, Technology and Mathematics. Gallaudet is the world’s only liberal arts university for deaf and hard-of-hearing students. He oversees the Molecular Genetics Laboratory, where deaf undergraduate students perform research alongside deaf faculty. Research interests include mutations in the connexin 26 gene, which are responsible for up to half of congenital deafness in many world populations.

This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences.

A young child smiling

Deaf schoolboy scores ‘higher than Einstein’ in IQ test

By ASL, Bilingual, Cultural & Medical Perspectives, Deaf Community, Deaf History, Deaf in the News, Deaf Role Models, Identity, Information No Comments

A photo of Darren Toh.

A 12-year-old boy has joined Mensa after achieving 162 on an IQ test, a higher score than Albert Einstein or Stephen Hawking.

Darren Toh, who was born deaf, is also an accomplished musician. He scored the highest grade possible for a child on the test.

The boy from Aughton, Lancashire, said he thought he was smart but “not quite a genius”.

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