Category

Deaf Community

Definitions & Identities

By Deaf Community, Deaf Culture, Identity, Information

The words "Deaf and Hard of Hearing" in rainbow-coloured text. The "i" in "Hearing" is dotted with a ladybug.

The following is an excerpt from the National Association of the Deaf :

The Deaf and hard of hearing community is diverse. There are variations in how a person becomes Deaf or hard of hearing, level of hearing, age of onset, educational background, communication methods, and cultural identity. How people “label” or identify themselves is personal and may reflect identification with the Deaf and hard of hearing community, the degree to which they can hear, or the relative age of onset.

For example, some people identify themselves as “late-deafened,” indicating that they became deaf later in life. Other people identify themselves as “deaf-blind,” which usually indicates that they are Deaf or hard of hearing and also have some degree of vision loss. Some people believe that the term “people with hearing loss” is inclusive and efficient. However, some people who were born Deaf or hard of hearing do not think of themselves as having lost their hearing. Over the years, the most commonly accepted terms have come to be “Deaf,” and “hard of hearing.”

According to Carol Padden and Tom Humphries, in Deaf in America: Voices from a Culture (1988): we use the lowercase deaf when referring to the audiological condition of not hearing, and the uppercase Deaf when referring to a particular group of Deaf people who share a language – American Sign Language (ASL) – a culture, [and community]. The members of this group have inherited their sign language, use it as a primary means of communication among themselves, and hold a set of beliefs about themselves and their connection to the larger society. We distinguish them from, for example, those who find themselves losing their hearing because of illness, trauma or age; although these people share the condition of not hearing, they do not have access to the knowledge, beliefs, and practices that make up the culture of Deaf people.

“Hard-of-hearing” can denote a person with a mild-to-moderate hearing loss. Or it can denote a deaf person who doesn’t have/want any cultural affiliation with the Deaf community. Or both. The HOH dilemma: in some ways hearing, in some ways deaf, in others, neither. Can one be hard-of-hearing and ASL-Deaf? That’s possible, too. Can one be hard-of-hearing and function as hearing? Of course. What about being hard-of-hearing and functioning as a member of both the hearing and Deaf communities? That’s a delicate tightrope-balancing act, but it too is possible. As for the political dimension: HOH people can be allies of the Deaf community. They can choose to join or to ignore it. They can participate in the social, cultural, political, and legal life of the community along with culturally-Deaf or live their lives completely within the parameters of the “Hearing world.” But they may have a more difficult time establishing a  satisfying cultural/social identity. Deaf Life, “For Hearing People Only” (October 1997).

The term “hearing-impaired” is no longer accepted by most in the community and is not a politically correct term. The term “hearing-impaired” is viewed as negative as it focuses on what people can’t do. It establishes the standard as “hearing” and anything different as “impaired,” or substandard, hindered, or damaged. It implies that something is not as it should be and ought to be fixed if possible. Every individual is unique.

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An image of a male torso with ASL sign for ART surrounded with pencils, paint brushes, colour pencils and crayons

Deaf Art: De’Via

By Deaf Community, Deaf Culture, Deaf History, Information

An image of a male torso with ASL sign for ART surrounded with pencils, paint brushes, colour pencils and crayons

De’VIA is an art movement formed by Deaf artists to express their Deaf experience. The term was coined by a group of Deaf artists in 1989 at the first Deaf Way festival, and it stands for Deaf View Image Art.

While Deaf artists create art that deals with the same subject matter as hearing artists, De’VIA artists and art express the particular experiences born of being Deaf. This art can focus on the physical and cultural characteristics of being Deaf, and can include Deaf metaphors and perspectives as well as Deaf insights into environments (natural and cultural), spiritual life, and everyday life.

De’VIA art often makes use of bold, contrasting colours and textures. It frequently uses a strong central image, and facial features such as eyes, mouths, and ears, as well as hands, are emphasized.

Some famous De’VIA artists are Betty G. Miller, Chuck Baird, Ann Silver, and Mary J. Thornley.

DEAF ART WEBSITE

ASL Babysitters

By ASL, Deaf Community, Deaf Role Models, Early ASL Acquisition, Early Language Development, Information

As a positive ASL role model, a Deaf babysitter can be a wonderful addition to your child’s language acquisition plan. The babysitter will bring to your home a rich ASL environment that includes but is not limited to storytelling, fun activities, turn-taking conversation, and so forth on.

By helping them to learn how to interact in ASL, the babysitter will help your child and their siblings to develop confidence in their language skills. It is imperative that parents seek out qualified ASL babysitters who will truly enhance their children’s ASL and literacy skills. This will result in more effective and enjoyable family communication.

A Deaf child who is exposed to the language-rich environment provided by their ASL babysitter will develop a better understanding of storytelling features, including phonology, and syllable awareness. The child will be able to observe natural language use by a fluent ASL user (who may also be closer in age to them than an adult).

ASL babysitters will make great language models for your Deaf child and their siblings.

 

A checklist outlining benefits of an ASL babysitter

Deaf Poets Society

By ASL, Deaf Community, Deaf Culture, Deaf Ecosystem, Deaf Role Models, Information, Professional Spotlight No Comments

Douglas Ridloff is a poet and visual storyteller creating original works in American Sign Language. And in support of signing, his goal is to make ASL a part of the whole community, not just a part of a marginalized community. Douglas wants to make signing hip and significant.

Douglas Ridloff is the owner, executive director and host of ASL SLAM (www.aslslam.com) a monthly open mic event in NYC that functions as a space for the Deaf community to creatively play with ASL through poetry performances, improv, games and storytelling, often bringing special guests from around the world to perform. As a widely popular platform, ASL SLAM has now been established as a monthly event in Washington DC, Chicago and Orlando with Douglas’s oversight and guidance. Recently, Douglas has organized performances at the Whitney Museum, the Jewish Museum, SITE Santa Fe and the 9/11 Memorial Museum, and has traveled to perform his own poetry and to bring ASL SLAM to Deaf communities around the world, including Jamaica, Cuba, Finland, England, Sweden and Australia.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community.

Visit Douglas Ridloff with TEDx