Category

Identity

Blue background with white text "Gallaudet University / Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center - Deaf Schools. Deaf Education: Serving Families and Professional Nationwide."

Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center

By ASL, Bilingual, Bilingual Education, Deaf Ecosystem, Deaf Role Models, Early ASL Acquisition, Early Intervention, Early Language Development, Identity, Information, Language Deprivation, Programs, Research

Blue background with white text "Gallaudet University / Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center - Deaf Schools. Deaf Education: Serving Families and Professional Nationwide."The Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center at Gallaudet University is a federally funded center with exemplary elementary and secondary education programs for deaf and hard of hearing students and is tasked with developing and disseminating innovative curricula, instructional techniques, and products nationwide while providing information, training, and technical assistance for parents and professionals to meet the needs of deaf and hard of hearing students from birth to age 21.

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four squares: top left is a person who is black, with short hair. They are wearing a white shirt with a grey suit jacket. Bottom left: a person who is black with long black hair. They are wearing a blue and purple plaid shirt. Top right: a green background with words that read "Interview with Victoria Monroe". Bottom right: a person who is black with short cropped hair wearing a grey jacket. They appear to be making the hand sign for the letter C.

Interview with Victoria Monroe

By Deaf Community, Deaf Culture, Deaf Ecosystem, Deaf Role Models, DeafBlind, Identity, Information, Professional Spotlight

From CORE:

“On October 28, 2020, Jayvon Harmon and Shaila Sams, Unity for Diversity members, interviewed Victorica Monroe. The chemistry between Jayvon, Shaila, and Victorica was powerful. The camaraderie between them authenticated their beautiful existence as Black folxs. Their questions nourished the much-needed answers about being Black, Deaf-Blind, and Androgynous, which is why we must honor every facet of our students’ intersecting backgrounds…”

Learn more about the interview to gain insight on the importance of community, and gain insight into life as Black, Deaf-Blind, and Androgynous folxs.

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Definitions & Identities

By Deaf Community, Deaf Culture, Identity, Information

The words "Deaf and Hard of Hearing" in rainbow-coloured text. The "i" in "Hearing" is dotted with a ladybug.

The following is an excerpt from the National Association of the Deaf :

The Deaf and hard of hearing community is diverse. There are variations in how a person becomes Deaf or hard of hearing, level of hearing, age of onset, educational background, communication methods, and cultural identity. How people “label” or identify themselves is personal and may reflect identification with the Deaf and hard of hearing community, the degree to which they can hear, or the relative age of onset.

For example, some people identify themselves as “late-deafened,” indicating that they became deaf later in life. Other people identify themselves as “deaf-blind,” which usually indicates that they are Deaf or hard of hearing and also have some degree of vision loss. Some people believe that the term “people with hearing loss” is inclusive and efficient. However, some people who were born Deaf or hard of hearing do not think of themselves as having lost their hearing. Over the years, the most commonly accepted terms have come to be “Deaf,” and “hard of hearing.”

According to Carol Padden and Tom Humphries, in Deaf in America: Voices from a Culture (1988): we use the lowercase deaf when referring to the audiological condition of not hearing, and the uppercase Deaf when referring to a particular group of Deaf people who share a language – American Sign Language (ASL) – a culture, [and community]. The members of this group have inherited their sign language, use it as a primary means of communication among themselves, and hold a set of beliefs about themselves and their connection to the larger society. We distinguish them from, for example, those who find themselves losing their hearing because of illness, trauma or age; although these people share the condition of not hearing, they do not have access to the knowledge, beliefs, and practices that make up the culture of Deaf people.

“Hard-of-hearing” can denote a person with a mild-to-moderate hearing loss. Or it can denote a deaf person who doesn’t have/want any cultural affiliation with the Deaf community. Or both. The HOH dilemma: in some ways hearing, in some ways deaf, in others, neither. Can one be hard-of-hearing and ASL-Deaf? That’s possible, too. Can one be hard-of-hearing and function as hearing? Of course. What about being hard-of-hearing and functioning as a member of both the hearing and Deaf communities? That’s a delicate tightrope-balancing act, but it too is possible. As for the political dimension: HOH people can be allies of the Deaf community. They can choose to join or to ignore it. They can participate in the social, cultural, political, and legal life of the community along with culturally-Deaf or live their lives completely within the parameters of the “Hearing world.” But they may have a more difficult time establishing a  satisfying cultural/social identity. Deaf Life, “For Hearing People Only” (October 1997).

The term “hearing-impaired” is no longer accepted by most in the community and is not a politically correct term. The term “hearing-impaired” is viewed as negative as it focuses on what people can’t do. It establishes the standard as “hearing” and anything different as “impaired,” or substandard, hindered, or damaged. It implies that something is not as it should be and ought to be fixed if possible. Every individual is unique.

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Growing Together: Creating Language-Rich Environments

By ASL, Bilingual, Bilingual Education, Early Intervention, Early Language Development, Identity, Information, Programs

Established as a National Science Foundation Science of Learning Center in 2006, Visual Language and Visual Learning (VL2) seeks to advance understanding of the behavioral and brain mechanisms of learning.

Through collaborative research, the Center works to answer fundamental science questions about higher cognition and how humans learn, especially learning through the eyes. We investigate the effect of visual processes, visual language, and visual learning and social experiences on the development of cognition and language, reading, and literacy. With a particular focus on deaf individuals and sign language, we study learning processes in monolinguals and bilinguals across the life span in order to promote the meaningful translation of science for the benefit of education and society.

VL2 has created a set of visually appealing and accessible materials about VL2’s research on the advantages of early visual language and ASL-English bilingualism and what this means for deaf and hard of hearing children’s language acquisition and literacy.

“Growing Together: Creating Language-Rich Environments” is a series of interviews with parents, researchers, and scientists.

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Lexi Hill’s Message to Hearing Parents with Deaf Children

By ASL, Cultural & Medical Perspectives, Identity, Information No Comments

Born deaf, REL senior Lexi Hill is ranked 7th in her class & will attend Gallaudet University, where she received the highest scholarship available & will play basketball! She has an encouraging message for both parents & students.