Category

Bilingual Education

Stories from Silent Childhood

By Bilingual Education, Deaf Community, Deaf Culture, Deaf Ecosystem, Deaf in the News, Information, Sign Languages Around the World No Comments

Dr. Reijntjes School For The Deaf was established more than three decades ago, in an effort to provide an education to Sri Lanka’s Deaf children, and give them a chance to become productive citizens of the country. We visited the school to get a glimpse into their hopes, fears and ambitions.

Watch the full video on Facebook

Through Your Child’s Eyes: American Sign Language

By ASL, Bilingual, Bilingual Education, Early ASL Acquisition, Early Intervention, Early Language Development, Information, Research

Through collaborative efforts of VL2 Lab, California State University at Northridge and the California Department of Education in the dissemination of their video on the benefits of early exposure to a visual language and a bilingual ASL-English Education. A Spanish language version of this video is also available at the same link.

This movie, “Through Your Child’s Eyes,” was created from the vision of the California Department of Education and California State University, Northridge. Funding provided by the Annenberg Foundation.

This video reviews what we know about ASL and bilingualism (research that VL2’s work also corroborates).

All babies benefit from sign language. Thousands of hearing babies learn to sign before they talk. ASL is a language for the whole family and community. Vision is the natural pathway for brain cognition, connections and language acquisition for deaf and hard of hearing children. It taps into the child’s strengths. ASL supports the development of written and spoken English and other languages. Children can easily acquire and use more than one language at the same time. ASL is one of the most widely used languages in the United States. Time is of the essence. Infancy is a critical period for language access and language acquisition. But it’s never too late – hearing people of all ages can learn ASL.

Visit VL2 Website

Visit CSUN Website

 

SignWise for Kids

By ASL, Bilingual Education, Information, Learn ASL, Website

White logo with purple text "Sign - ise" with the W turning into an owl graphic

A premier Quality Assurance Resource Center established in 2016, Signwise for Kids™ is dedicated to promoting the use and development  of accurate, high quality American Sign Language and Deaf-related products for young children from infant to elementary school age and their families.

They remove the guesswork for parents and professionals who wonder if a product is appropriate for your child. You want to know about the company that created the products and their experiences with sign language and the deaf community. You may question whether the portrayal of a deaf/hard of hearing child appropriate. And many other questions.

They are a trusted resource for families and offer detailed product reviews, which include specific features and detailed reporting on the accuracy and quality of each product. This allows you to make an informed decision about the best product for your deaf or hard of hearing child.

VISIT WEBSITE

Deaf Parents of Cochlear-Implanted Children: Beliefs on Bimodal Bilingualism

By Bilingual, Bilingual Education, Information, Research

Deaf Parents of Cochlear-Implanted Children: Beliefs on Bimodal Bilingualism by Julie Mitchiner

This study investigated 17 Deaf families in North America with cochlear-implanted children about their attitudes, beliefs, and practices on bimodal bilingualism (defined as using both a visual/manual language and an aural/oral language) in American Sign Language (ASL) and English. A survey and follow-up interviews with 8 families were conducted. The majority of the Deaf families exhibited positive beliefs toward bimodal bilingualism, where they set high expectations for their children to become equally fluent in both languages. However, their perspectives about the purpose for each language differed; they viewed English as a “survival language” and ASL as a “cultural language” but yet supported the use of both languages at home as part of their children’s lives.

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